Book Clubs

Kepler's invites you to register your Book Club with our store. As a registered Book Club you will receive these benefits:

  • 15% discount on orders of five or more books (same title)
  • Emails on Book Club picks, Book Club news and Recent Reviews
  • We can arrange Author call-ins for your Book Club
  • Your Book Club will be invited to our Seasonal Book Club Presentations, featuring local authors


To Register your book club click here.

If you ever have questions, email us at bookclub@keplers.com

To see our list of suggested Book Club Summer Reading, Click Here.

REMINDER: No book club meetings in December. 

Click HERE to see what other books our local book clubs are reading! Sina Herkelrath, Book Club Coordinator




We have several wonderful in-store bookclubs. You are welcome to join us at any of the book club meetings listed below.

Big Ideas Reading Group

Focusing on Science, Philosophy, and Technology


    Saturday, January 10, 2015, 4:00 p.m.

The Map and the Territory: Risk, Human Nature, and the Future of Forecasting by Alan Greenspan

Like all of us, though few so visibly, Alan Greenspan was forced by the financial crisis of 2008 to question some fundamental assumptions about risk management and economic forecasting. No one with any meaningful role in economic decision making in the world saw beforehand the storm for what it was. How had our models so utterly failed us?

To answer this question, Alan Greenspan embarked on a rigorous and far-reaching multiyear examination of how Homo economicus predicts the economic future, and how it can predict it better.

      

    Saturday, March 14, 4:00 p.m.

The Improbability Principle: Why Coincidences, Miracles, and Rare Events Happen Every Day by David J. Hand

In The Improbability Principle, the renowned statistician David J. Hand argues that extraordinarily rare events are anything but. In fact, they’re commonplace. Not only that, we should all expect to experience a miracle roughly once every month.

But Hand is no believer in superstitions, prophecies, or the paranormal. His definition of “miracle” is thoroughly rational. All we need, Hand argues, is a firm grounding in a powerful set of laws: the laws of inevitability, of truly large numbers, of selection, of the probability lever, and of near enough.

“In my experience, it is very rare to find a book that is both erudite and entertaining. Yet The Improbability Principle is such a book. Surely this cannot be due to chance alone!” —Hal R. Varian, chief economist at Google and professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley

      



Friday Night Book Club

      
    Friday, January 9, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

Behind the Beautiful Forevers  Katherine Boo

 

In this brilliant, breathtaking book by Pulitzer Prize winner Katherine Boo, a bewildering age of global change and inequality is made human through the dramatic story of families striving toward a better life in Annawadi, a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport. 

      
    Friday, February 6, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

The Short History of Nearly Everything  by Bill Bryson

 

In this book Bryson confronts his greatest challenge: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. 

      
    Friday, March 6, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

In the Heart of the Sea  by Nathaniel Philbrick

 

In 1819, the Essex left Nantucket for the South Pacific. In the middle of the South Pacific the ship was rammed and sunk by an angry sperm whale. The crew drifted for more than 90 days in three tiny whaleboats, succumbing to weather, hunger, disease, and ultimately turning to drastic measures in the fight for survival.

Nathaniel Philbrick uses little-known documents-including a long-lost account written by the ship's cabin boy-and penetrating details about whaling and the Nantucket community to reveal the chilling events surrounding this epic maritime disaster. An intense and mesmerizing read. 

      
    Friday, April 3, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

A Jane Austen Education  by William Deresiewicz

 

This intelligent, lively look at the beloved author's novels and what they offered in life lessons to one graduate student will resonate with all Austen fans - and others as well. Like many of us, Deresiewicz, an Austen scholar, found deep lessons on life, love, friendship, and marriage in the pages and parlors of dear Jane's books. 

      
    Friday, May 1, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

The Wolf and the Watchman by Scott Johnson

 

Growing up, Scott C. Johnson always suspected that his father was different. Only as a teenager did he discover the truth: his father was a spy, one of the CIA s most trusted officers. At first the secret was thrilling. But over time Scott began to have doubts. How could a man so rigorously trained to deceive and manipulate simply turn off those skills at home? His father had been living a double life for so long that his lies were hard to separate from the truth. 

 
      
    

Daytime Fiction - & More - Book Club

    Sunday, January 25, 2:00 p.m.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr


From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant "New York Times" bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.

      


Fiction Book Club

      
     
   Monday, January 12, 7:00 p.m.

Mr. Penumbra's 24 Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloane


The Great Recession has shuffled Clay Jannon away from life as a San Francisco web-design drone and into the aisles of Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. But after a few days on the job, Clay discovers that the store is more curious than either its name or its gnomic owner might suggest. The customers are few, and they never seem to buy anything...

      



Spanish Book Club (The Spanish Book Club does not meet in June or December.)

     
    Monday, January 12, 7:00 p.m. 

El hombre que amaba a los perros  by Leonardo Padura

 

A gripping novel about the assassination of Leon Trotsky in Mexico City in 1940.

In The Man Who Loved Dogs, Leonardo Padura brings a noir sensibility to one of the most fascinating and complex political narratives of the past hundred years: the assassination of Leon Trotsky by Ramón Mercader.

     
    Monday, February 9, 7:00 p.m. 

Cien años de soledad  by Gabriel García Márquez

 

Con estas palabras empieza una novela ya legendaria en los anales de la literatura universal, una de las aventuras literarias más fascinantes del siglo xx. Millones de ejemplares de Cien años de soledad leídos en todas las lenguas y el Premio Nobel de Literatura coronando una obra que se había abierto paso a “boca a boca” —como gusta decir el escritor— son la más palpable demostración de que la aventura fabulosa de la familia Buendía-Iguarán, con sus milagros, fantasías, obsesiones, tragedias, incestos, adulterios, rebeldías, descubrimientos y condenas, representaba al mismo tiempo el mito y la historia, la tragedia y el amor del mundo entero.

     
    Monday, March 9, 7:00 p.m. 

Sangre en el ojo  by Lina Meruane

 

At a party, Lucina leans down to pick up her insulin syringe when she notices a thin thread of blood invading her eye. These hemorrhages will leave her blind, permanently or temporarily it is not known. She will be faced with darkness, helplesness and a return to Chile from New York and to her parents house, to everything she had fled, and this will lead her down the path of cruelty, and finally hatred.